Self Mastery 101: Locus of control

I like reading rags-to-riches stories. Who doesn't, right? But I even like rags to now-ok stories. Like the impoverished houewife who went on to own a sari sari store with a daily gross of Php4,000 - which was roughly her initial starting capital! Or the woman who became a millionaire from selling trash and junk.

No matter which story you read though, it invariably comes down to a generic (if over-simplified) formula: They were down and out, they did something, and now they're on top.

And that's really the crux of the whole thing. They did something and it changed their situation. It's almost as compelling (or more so, depending on your tastes) as reading about super powers and magical abilities.

And that's where locus of control comes in. We may not have super powers or magical abilities. But we sometimes forget just how much influence we can exert on the world around us.

9 Sneaky Charges And Other Money Traps

9 Sneaky Charges And Other Money Traps.  Don't you just hate it when you end up spending more than you have to?   It's one of my pet peeves; specially when the "large print" keeps touting affordability but the "fine print" keeps making you shell out more money.  So I figured I'd put together some of these "money traps". It's not a bad idea to pay for them, but it's always a good idea to know these things in advance. That way we can be proactive, learn to ask, and take control of the conversation. Instead of just let the other person dominate the conversation with rosy pictures and sales pitches.
Don't you just hate it when you end up spending more than you have to? 

It's one of my pet peeves; specially when the "large print" keeps touting affordability but the "fine print" keeps making you shell out more money.

So I figured I'd put together some of these "money traps". It's not a bad idea to pay for them, but it's always a good idea to know these things in advance. That way we can be proactive, learn to ask, and take control of the conversation. Instead of just let the other person dominate the conversation with rosy pictures and sales pitches.

Sunk Cost Fallacy


It's somethings that's been covered elsewhere before, so I won't belabor the point too much.


(Worth mentioning: Fitz has a great article on sunk cost. And Investor Juan also partly covered it in a very enlightening article he posted a few years ago.)

But it's really important to keep in mind that decisions should be made for the best possible outcome instead of not seeing past effort (or past investments) go to waste.




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My New Years Plan for 2014 - and beyond

I would have preferred to write this post earlier; maybe even last December. But life always intervenes. That's not such a bad thing though.

Despite the mad rush of things to get done and other minor emergencies, I've had occasional moments to stop and reflect.

The Obvious And The Significant

The Obvious And The Significant. The big obvious things aren't always the biggest issues. Some things attract a lot of attention but aren't the real or most pressing issues. It's not a bad idea for us to stop every now and then to really think things through a bit more.
Gas is expensive. Early this year they announced another price hike - a big Php1.10 or so hike.

Like most people, I immediately wished I had loaded up the week before. Especially since my gas tank was just around 25% full.

But then I started doing some math. At a full tank of 40 liters, it meant I had 30 or so liters to fill up. And at a new price of 52.75 (previously 51.60) all I would really save was Php34.5 - not even a liter of gas.

4 Signs That You're Still A Newbie Stock Investor

I've been investing in stocks for years now, but I realized I haven't come that far yet. I mean, there's all kinds of terms I learned. And I can generally follow even some techy or "deep" stock-speak.

But when it comes to the actual execution, my skills still aren't that great. What do I mean? Well here's four signs to demonstrate that.