Boys Break Things Men Fix Things

Boys Break Things Men Fix Things. In practically ancient times, boys (and sometimes even girls actually) watched or helped their fathers perform household repairs or improvements. Despite that - or perhaps because of it, I'm not sure - us boys would inevitably practice our busy fingers to satisfy our curiosities. Screws would be loosened, wood bars and planks would be shaved or cut into uselessness, and bulky gadgets of bygone days would be opened and disassembled until they refused to work. And yet as I think about it now, those same boys are fixing cars, repainting their condos by themselves, and even performing repairs on cellphones and other gadgets. But of course, plenty of others do not. For those that made the "leap", what has changed is not so much their skill or knowledge but their mindset.
At a mere 32 years of age, I already feel like part of a dying breed.

In practically ancient times, boys (and sometimes even girls, actually) watched or helped their fathers perform household repairs or improvements.

Armed with a bewildering assortment of tools, boys of yesteryears would help or watch their dads replace water damaged ceilings, replace leaky pipes, change oils on cars, replace broken faucets and a variety of other tasks.

Despite that - or perhaps because of it, I'm not sure - us boys would inevitably practice our busy fingers to satisfy our curiosities.

Screws would be loosened, wood bars and planks would be shaved or cut into uselessness, and bulky gadgets of bygone days would be opened and disassembled until they refused to work.

In this age of touch screens and digital everything, such pastimes have been rendered practically obsolete.

Boys Break Things Men Fix Things. In practically ancient times, boys (and sometimes even girls actually) watched or helped their fathers perform household repairs or improvements. Despite that - or perhaps because of it, I'm not sure - us boys would inevitably practice our busy fingers to satisfy our curiosities. Screws would be loosened, wood bars and planks would be shaved or cut into uselessness, and bulky gadgets of bygone days would be opened and disassembled until they refused to work. And yet as I think about it now, those same boys are fixing cars, repainting their condos by themselves, and even performing repairs on cellphones and other gadgets. But of course, plenty of others do not. For those that made the "leap", what has changed is not so much their skill or knowledge but their mindset.
And yet as I think about it now, those same boys are fixing cars, repainting their condos by themselves, and even performing repairs on cellphones and other gadgets.

But of course, plenty of others do not. For those that made the "leap", what has changed is not so much their skill or knowledge but their mindset.

It is not that curiosity has given way to responsibility.

It is actually that same curiosity, but now harnessed to force ourselves to be familiar with the unfamiliar, to understand what seems arcane, and to try what seems difficult.

It isn't anymore a child's idle curiosity, to be practiced only when there's nothing to do. Instead it is mixed with conviction; to persevere until we reach a stage that is not only acceptable but desired.

To not stop because it's nap time, or because it's time for our parents to fix it for real. But instead to focus and stay patient, with the conviction that the best person to know, the best person to fix it - whatever it is - is no one else but us.

And in the end that conviction is what separates men from boys.


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photo credit: Rob Welsh via photopin cc
photo credit: super-structure via photopin cc

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