Estate Planning For Newbies, Part1: What It Is And Why It's Important

Estate Planning For Newbies, Part1: What It Is And Why It's Important  Estate planning is nothing more than being tax-efficient, so your heirs get as much as possible. In this post we'll learn how much tax our heirs will need to pay, what the allowable deductions are, and what options are available to handle the estate tax.
With All Souls day (and Halloween) around the corner, I figured it's not a bad time to broach a topic that starts with death. Well ok, there never is a good time but I figured I might as well be in season.

Like investing, estate planning is usually thought of as something just for rich people. But that's not really the case.

Did you know that if you die, your surviving family will need to pay the government up to 20% of what you left them? 

How To Practice Insider Trading in PSE - Legally!

How To Practice Insider Trading in PSE - Legally! Ok, I admit, it's not about insider trading. But there is a way you can leverage what insiders know, without having to resort to insider trading. And you don't have to get close to anyone or even socialize with them. All you have to do is go to PSE's official website and look under disclosures. You can search by company if you're interested in a particular stock. Or you can check this particular disclosure type: "Statement of Changes in Beneficial Ownership of Securities".
Ok, I admit, it's not about insider trading.

But there is a way you can leverage what insiders know, without having to resort to insider trading.

Although there are plenty of other ways to make money on stocks (perhaps even safer ones, since such info can be tricky), there is something to be said about leveraging the knowledge of people in the company that are in position to really know how the business is doing.

More to the point, they can provide some perspective if the current stock price is inflated, or unnecessarily low.

And you don't have to get close to anyone or even socialize with them.

Stock Investing Is Like Shopping

Stock Investing Is Like Shopping.  Analogies are one of the basic ways to learn something - transferring knowledge from one aspect and applying it in another.  And one of the toughest hurdles in stock market investing is the sheer unfamiliarity of it.  So I though it made sense to try and explain stocks by comparing it with one of the most basic and mundane tasks - grocery shopping.  Hopefully more Filipinos will see it, understand it's not so arcane, and be encouraged to learn more. If nothing else, at least there's another way to think/explain stocks other than poker or some other form of gambling.
Analogies are one of the basic ways to learn something - transferring knowledge from one aspect and applying it in another.

And one of the toughest hurdles in stock market investing is the sheer unfamiliarity of it.

So I thought it made sense to try and explain stocks by comparing it with one of the most basic and mundane tasks - grocery shopping.

Hopefully more Filipinos will see it, understand it's not so arcane, and be encouraged to learn more. If nothing else, at least there's another way to think/explain stocks other than poker or some other form of gambling.

The Non-liner Approach To Your Ideal Self

Ah yes, time for yet another TV-inspired post.

Ms. Kim is the main character of the Korean TV series "Queen of Office". She's a contractual worker (apparently a problem there as well, not just here). But not an ordinary one.

The Non-liner Approach To Your Ideal Self. Being better - being you ideal self - isn't about climbing a ladder. It's simply completing yourself by acquiring skills and achieving goals. Improvement is about being better and not necessarily about following a script. There is no up, down or sideways. It's all just a matter of growth. Life is just a series of choices, whether we see them or not. Just choose to be better every day.
She's relatively highly paid and much sought after. She even dictates the terms of her contract. Negotiations and job interviews are practically formalities where she tells her employer what the setup will be. (Yes, an obviously only-on-tv thing; but there's a real point to this at the end.)

On the surface, this is because she is incredibly efficient and knowledgeable. It's also partly because she's a jack of all trades (though in true TV fashion, seemingly a master in all of them).

But in more practical terms she also provides value-added services - not only does she complete her normal desk work promptly and excellently, she also insists on making coffee (because the usual office coffee is terrible, and she brews great coffee), mops the floor, cleans the comfort rooms, and uses a variety of impressive skills to complete the team's goals.

She is, of course, a fictional character and there isn't much point in comparing ourselves to someone whose skills, personality, and even experiences were scripted and planned out. Right?

How Being Financially Literate Can Help You Better Prepare For Future Events

How Being Financially Literate Can Help You Better Prepare For Future Events.  While at the bank, I saw a pamphlet from an insurance company advertising their product to help you prepare for your child's tuition.  So in this post, I'm comparing the returns of their plan with what you can get if you invest the money instead.
While at the bank, I saw a pamphlet from an insurance company advertising their products to help you prepare for your child's tuition, having savings, and getting insurance.

My attention was immediately focused on the one for tuition. I'd rather not mention the company since this is neither an advertorial nor an exercise in disparaging them.

I'd just like to point out how being financially literate can help you prepare better for future events.

What I Did With My 6K

(if you stay patient and endure my babbling, I promise there's actually a point at the end of this post...)

So I've finally gotten a taste of the "real world". Not that I grew up privileged. But when you're single, you have more control over your financial goals (as Mark pointed out before).

After saving (and investing) for our child's college education, our retirement, and allocating some funds to increase our emergency fund, most of what's left are for car and house payments.

In about 5 years my finances should ease up somewhat. But as it is, I don't have a whole lot to just invest in stocks (for personal goals that is). Which is why windfalls are really welcome. And which ends my long-winded and rather self-absorbed intro and brings up the real point of this post. (finally!:)

5 Tips for Aspiring Entrepreneurs on Starting Small

I've tried to be well-rounded in the topics I cover in this blog. However, I can't write what I don't know or haven't experienced. So a big glaring whole is the topic on having your own business. Luckily, today we have a guest post from Gina Ballesteros of Regus, offering some nice tips for entrepreneurs on starting small.

Effective personal finance management tips for teens - being fiscally responsible

Today we've got a guest post from Kane Clark, a financial writer from the U.S. If you reside outside the U.S. the issue of student loans may not be that relevant, but I think the the rest of the article should still be.

Normally, I'd try to give an intro, but in this case I'd like to share my thoughts after the article.

You're Buried In Debt What Should You Do? And How Do You Deal With Collectors?

No one wants to be in debt. But unfortunately, for various reasons, it happens.

In this post, we're going to go over what you can do.

The Case For Passive Investing

The Case For Passive Investing. We people are curious creatures: we work really hard for passive income and to live a life we want when we're 40, 50, or 60 years old.  But then we tend to forgo (or forget about) passive investing - which allows us to grow our now, doesn't get in the way of pursuing other goals, and still allows us to live our lives now, not decades from now. There are several ways to passively invest: Cost Averaging, Compound Interest on Time Deposits, and Buy and Hold. In this post, we'll examine the merits of each one.
We people are curious creatures: we work really hard for passive income and to live a life we want when we're 40, 50, or 60 years old.

But then we tend to forgo (or forget about) passive investing - which allows us to grow our money now, doesn't get in the way of pursuing other goals, and still allows us to live our lives now, not decades from now.