How You Should Evaluate Your Stock Broker And Why I Finally Switched

After sticking with my stock broker for over a year, I decided to finally switch. And in this post I'm going to discuss the reasons why and give you an idea if your current broker is right for you.
I decided to finally switch stock brokers. And in this post I'm going to discuss the reasons why and give you an idea if your current broker is right for you.

There are two types of stock brokers in general: traditional and online.

Traditional brokers are ones you call over the phone to make transactions - so you get to talk to an actual human being. Online brokers are practically websites with information and buttons you can click. There are hotlines you can call as well as email support. But for the most part there's no human element.

Despite the difference though, I view them the same way. After all, they serve the same purpose - let you buy stocks.

Here are factors you can use to evaluate your broker:

An Overview Of Fundamental Analysis For The Stock Market part 2

An Overview Of Fundamental Analysis For The Stock Market part 2. In this second part, we'll tackle some key concepts (PE ratio, earnings per share, debt-to-equity, net income, operating income, operational advantage, competitive advantage. And I'll even provide some free reference materials in the end.
This is part 2, if you haven't read part 1 yet, please do so.

In this second part, we'll tackle some key concepts. And I'll provide some free reference materials in the end.

An Overview Of Fundamental Analysis For The Stock Market part 1

An Overview Of Fundamental Analysis For The Stock Market. Part 1 of a 2-part series. In this part we'll go over what it is, what it can do and what it can't do.
Previously I posted a brief, simple overview of technical analysis for the stock market.

My reasoning was simple: You can't invest blindly and rudimentary technical analysis is easier to pick up than fundamental analysis.

Again, I'm not a professional trader, expert, nor do I have decades of experience. 

But since this is a personal fiance blog, I'd be remiss if I didn't at least try to give an overview of fundamental analysis. So in this post, I'll try to share a little bit on how ordinary investors can perform fundamental analysis. (Bear in mind, it's an introduction to guide people on understanding it and hopefully encouraging them to do it.)

Pay Yourself First - And Give Yourself Raises Too!

Pay Yourself First - And Give Yourself Raises Too! We all want raises, so why don't you give one to yourself? This post shows the different ways you can increase the amount you pay yourself.
Most - if not all - employees want bigger salaries. I know I do, and you probably do too. Even if you genuinely enjoy your job, it's a relatively safe bet that you won't last long if you don't get even a cost of living increase every now and then. And for most of us, if we had the power, we'd give ourselves big raises regularly.

But did you know you actually have that power?

Which Equity Fund Will Earn More Using Cost Averaging (Index Fund vs Other Equity Funds Part 2)

Which Equity Fund Will Earn More Using Cost Averaging (BDO Equity Fund vs PhilEquity Fund vs BPI ALFM Philippined Stock Index Fund vs FAMI Save and Learn Equity Fund)
In my previous post, I compared the index fund against the best equity funds out there. The index fund ate dust.

But even before that test, I had an inkling the index fund may not look that good compared to the "big boys" of the equity world.

And that gave me an idea. Equities are about accumulation and capital appreciation. That means to make money you buy a heck of a lot at a low price and wait until the price gets high. But because of the volatility (and the fact we're not all Warren Buffet), you're better off cost-averaging - buying a few at a time.

But what if there was a best of both worlds? What if I choose a fund with a performance that isn't the best? And I use the time it lags to hoard a lot of shares and then cash out when it hits the peak or the time is up and I need my cash?

In this post, we'll conduct an experiment if that is a viable strategy.

What To Do If Your ATM Gets Hacked

What To Do If Your ATM Gets Hacked - Some helpful tips on how to avoid getting your ATM card hacked. And if your ATM does get hacked, some tips on how to act and minimize the damage.
One Sunday, I was randomly checking my payroll account. I had already set aside money for my bills and investments a few days earlier (on the date of the salary payout). What was left was just my weekly "allowance."

So I immediately noticed that 500 pesos was missing, leaving only a little over 200 pesos in the account. I tried remembering if I had withdrawn that amount, but my wallet confirmed I did not.

So I snooped around, and sure enough a withdrawal of 500 pesos was made at around 11:00pm the previous night - while I was sound asleep. To make it worse, it had incurred charges for balance inquiry (2 pesos) and withdrawal (11 pesos) - alerting me that it was not withdrawn from the same bank as the account - one of my pet peeves.

All in all it didn't end too badly for me.  But that might not always be true for everyone. So I thought it might be a good idea to do a post on how to prevent the same thing from happening to you - or to get you through it if you aren't so lucky.

Comparing The Performance Of An Index Fund vs Other Equity Funds - Or Which Fund Gives The Highest Return

Comparing The Perfomrance Of An Index Fund vs Other Equity Funds - Or Which Fund Gives The Highest Return  BPI ALFM Philippine Stock Index Fund vs BDO Equity Fund vs FAMI's Save & Learn Equity Fund vs PhilEquity Fund. Which equity fund gave the highest return in 1 year? in 5 years?
A while ago, I wrote a post on index funds. I also gave my reasons for preferring index funds over other actively-managed equity funds.

So in this post, I will check if my reasoning is still valid.

We will compare the Index fund over various other popular funds.

Complacency Is Your Biggest Enemy Towards Financial Independence

Complacency Is Your Biggest Enemy Towards Financial Independence. And the reason why you rarely hear a middle-class to riches story, despite intuitively being easier to do - and therefore can occur more commonly - than a rags-to-riches story.
I never had a problem with my savings.

And to be honest, the mantra "a part of what you earn is yours to keep" rang true to me but did not really impact me that much. I was already saving a nice portion of my money before I heard it. And I didn't really need additional motivation to keep saving.

But after getting married, and having to pay our own utility bills, groceries, etc. I started saving less. Before I could live on 50-70% of my income (easier to do when single, I found out first-hand). After getting married I saved less than 10%. On some paydays, I couldn't save at all.

What's worse, I started using the same excuses I heard before.

That 70-20-10 rule is daunting. I should start small. I should just try to work my way up to living on just 70% of my income.

But fortunately, something great happened.