Which Equity Fund Is Better?

Finding the best Mutual Fund, UITF invested in stocks
That's the usual question I often encounter when people start investing. Of course, there are several factors that we can look at, when choosing the best fit for us.

But when people ask which is "better", they really mean which is giving better returns. Personally, I'm a firm believer that chasing the one with the highest returns right now isn't necessarily the best strategy. But of course, I wouldn't stick with a mediocre fund for long.

But performance isn't really as simple to gauge as just comparing the yield (or how much the NAVPU has appreciated). Just as different equity funds rise differently in a bull market, they also fall differently in a bear market or even during a correction.

So in this post, we'll see how some of the better-known funds have done since 2013 rolled in.

The Power of Waiting

The Power of Waiting. When it comes to making money in the stock market, a lot of emphasis seems to be on speed. But Being right is more profitable than being first. And so I've learned that it's best to wait. After all, if the stock will rise or dip, it will rise or dip; whether or not I trade. So it's much better for me to confirm what I think will happen.
When it comes to making money in the stock market, a lot of emphasis seems to be on speed.

When the stock market is depicted in the movies, the setting is usually a hectic room filled with brokers standing up or yelling or both.

And during the flash crash in the U.S. stock market, a lot of hoopla was made about supercomputers able to make a gazillion trades in a micro-second (ok, maybe that's a slight exaggeration).

And then there's insider information. Apparently, being the first to hear the news can make or break fortunes.

And the apparent lesson here is the same thing Ricky Bobby believed - "If you ain't first, you're last!"

But is it true?

Where To Invest Our Money

I'm sure this is a question that everyone's asked themselves at some point. And it's something that requires a lot of thought.

7 Things I Learned From the Stock Market

I'm not a stock broker, stock analyst, or financial consultant (although I like to think I'm able to give rational financial advise).

But I have been investing in stocks for a while now, so I'd like to give some practical advice to newbies. I think this is helpful because most experts have probably forgotten how it feels. Or they remember, but are now focused on more advance-level discussions such as stock-picking or chart analysis.

So I thought it might be a good thing to share things I've learned not to do when investing in stock.

Getting Around - And Over - The Mountain

The human race is without question the dominant species of our planet. And nothing is more symbolic of this than our position at the top of the food chain. And it's something we should be thankful for. If nothing else, at least no one eats us, right? :)

But when it comes to finance and economics, being at the end of the chain does not mean you're on top. And it's actually a bit disadvantageous. What do I mean?

Explaining The Different Kinds Of Dividends

Explaining The Different Kinds Of Dividends
I've talked before about why I like dividend paying stocks. But did you know that there are different types of dividends that can be paid to you?

I didn't know it myself when I first started investing in the stock market. So I decided to share them with you today.

Loan Payment Strategy

Lately, while browsing various forums, I've repeatedly come across a question about investing and debt.  The question is a variant of this basic scenario: I have X years left on my loan, at around X% interest per year. But I can pay off the remaining amount (ex: 500,000 or more). Should I pay off the loan or is it a good idea to invest the money instead? (P.S. I also have the capability to make the monthly payments, separate from the lump sum I have right now.)  What would be a good strategy in this case?
Lately, while browsing various forums, I've repeatedly come across a question about investing and debt.

The question is a variant of this basic scenario: I have X years left on my loan, at around X% interest per year. But I can pay off the remaining amount (ex: 500,000 or more). Should I pay off the loan or is it a good idea to invest the money instead? (P.S. I also have the capability to make the monthly payments, separate from the lump sum I have right now.)

What would be a good strategy in this case?

Sample Investment Portfolios

Diana, one of my readers, asked me if I had sample portfolios.

I didn't really have any. And I guess the reason there are few or none out there is partly because a portfolio is a personal thing. It depends so much on factors specific to us: our situation in life right now (financial and otherwise), our life goals/dreams/aspirations, our experiences, and of course our knowledge of, and confidence in, various investment instruments.

So I can't just come out and say I've got the perfect portfolio for anyone. So basically I wrote a post just to say I'm not going to do something.

Just kidding! :D

In this article I'm going to give a simple investment portfolio template and also show how your investments can be tailored to your needs.

We'll outline some basic scenarios and see what the best investment portfolio for them would be.

How To Save More: Make Plans - Literally

How To Save More: Make Plans - Literally. It's not unusual to get overwhelmed with the things we need to do or want to accomplish. Unfortunately, as the tools for productivity and convenience have increased, so too have the expectations and pace of our lives.  However, sometimes the answer isn't to do more; but instead to stop and reflect. The same is true for our finances. Saving and investing both need some thinking and planning to achieve maximum effect.
I guess I should start by saying I'm a very organized person in most things. Before I do anything I usually break it down into small steps. And I consistently try to find the most efficient way to get things done.

And to do that I usually make some sort of plan - most of the time as simple as a list of tasks and when the best time to do them would be.

I've accepted that I'm just a little nuts that way and that's actually not the norm. But I've come to realize how much planning is undervalued - or at least under-practiced - in our daily lives. So in this article, I'd like to suggest some ways where making a plan can really help us.

Your Personal Finance Map To Achieving Financial Freedom

I was surfing through the PinoyMoneyTalk forum (again) a few days ago and saw that one of the users, gelodj, made a financial model. It's a flowchart showing personal finance decisions and steps, with the goal of eventually being able to invest and achieve financial independence. 

I thought it was a great idea and, with his permission, made my own version.

If We Help Ourselves We Can Help Others

I was browsing through the PinoyMoneyTalk forum and encountered a thread talking about this news: Philippines' elite swallow country's new wealth.

Personally I have conflicting views over this: It's true, it's unfair; but it's nothing new and, more importantly, should also not be that important to an individual.